Ralph Martin – Airman from Kansas

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Ralph Edward Martin in WWII

Ralph Edward Martin – U.S. Air Force

A second cousin 1x removed in California sent me 4 photos of my uncle, Ralph Edward Martin. Ralph originally sent these to his cousin during the war.

I’ve been cleaning and purging and I was going through some old photos from my grandmother. I came across 4 photos that Ralph sent to her while in the Air Force. He signed one: “With all my love.” She wrote on the back: “Cousin Ralph Martin.” I wanted to know if you would like them

How thoughtful of her to pass these along to those more closely related to the person in the photograph. Now, I’d like to forward them on to even more direct relatives of Ralph, his two sons. Over the years, I’ve lost touch with David and Michael. Unfortunately, finding them online is quite difficult with the names David Martin and Michael Martin being all too common.

ralph___martha_martin__david_and_michael_edited

Martha (Clopton), Ralph Martin and their children David and Michael.

So, to take on this challenge, I’m posting some cousin bait here. The bait that I hope will attract my cousins, David and Michael, is information about their dad’s life.

Ralph Edward Martin

When Ralph Edward MARTIN was born on May 18, 1922, in Madison, Kansas, his father, Charles, was 30 and his mother, Cora, was 25. He married Martha Alice Clopton on November 23, 1946, when he was 24 years old. They had two children during their marriage.

Some of the places that Ralph lived over his 85 years of life:

  • Eureka, Kansas, in 1925
  •  Madison, Kansas, in 1930, 1935, 1940 (according to the census)
  • At age 20, he was working at Boeing Aircraft in Wichita Kansas. It was 1942.
  • He went into the Air Force and rose to the level of Lt. Col.
  • I’m sure that being in the Air Force, he was stationed in many places between the Kansas and Nevada parts of his life. I know there was China, Tokyo, but not sure about where else.
  • Las Vegas, Nevada, in 1993 where he lived during his retirement from the military. He died on September 29, 2007, in Las Vegas, Nevada, at the age of 85.

His father Charles Lorenzo “Ren” Martin passed away on March 28, 1968, in Emporia, Kansas, at the age of 76 and his mother Cora Myrle Joy passed away on November 16, 1969, in Madison, Kansas, at the age of 72.

Ralph Martin was featured in an article in the Kanhistique magazine by his sister-in-law, Gail Lee Martin. You can read that online WWII Kansan and his P-38 the Jayhawk.

2008-08-17 gail and ks photos 108

There’s a book about Ralph’s brother. It contains memories about Clyde Owen Martin and stories about his parents, Lorenzo and Cora (Joy) Martin, his siblings, Dorothy (Martin) Jones and Ralph Martin. It also has family history stories about his uncle Ivan Halligan, and his grandparents, Alfred and Marie (Kennedy) Joy. There are photos and essays about John T. Martin, David Greacen Kennedy, Elizabeth Rosebaugh, Moses O’Neil. Gail Lee Martin and her daughters gathered and wrote much of the history. The book is available from Amazon or the print-on-demand site blurb.com or from the historical museums in Eureka and El Dorado KS.

This is week 2 of the 52 Ancestor in 52 Weeks. The topic for the week was #Challenge.

The Death of Roy Martin, Son of John and Cordelia Martin

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The Hamilton Grit, Hamilton, KS

Thur. May 11. 1911

(transcribed from Newspapers.com)

A SAD ACCIDENT

A very sad accident occurred last Thursday afternoon, when Roy Martin, aged 14 years, 9 months and 11 days, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Martin, living about 10 miles northwest of Hamilton, was killed while at work in the field, the boy left the house at noon and went out to plow. About half hour after he had been seen talking to some boys, Dudley Dillingham and brothers, who were working nearby noticed him to be lying on the ground near the horses. On arriving where he was the boys found him dead.

One horse was standing on his lower limb which was broken, his foot entangled in the tug and his hand still grasping the lines. It is thought that the horse stepped over the tug and the boy attempted to raise its foot to put back without unfastening the tug and the horse had fallen or thrown itself on him, the dirt on it, showing it had been down but was standing quietly when found. Three of the child’s ribs were broken on one side, two on the other and his body otherwise mashed.

Funeral services were held at Prairie Bell church, 1:30 p.m. Saturday and were conducted by Rev. Wilson, of Virgil. Interment was made in the No. 8 cemetery.

Roy was a much liked little boy and had a host of friends who will miss him from their presence. He was the youngest of five children, three brothers and one sister surviving him. Relatives and friends have the heartfelt sympathy of all.

Citation for the clipping: 

11 May 1911, 1 – Hamilton Grit at Newspapers.com

11 May 1911, 1 – Hamilton Grit at Newspapers.com. (2018). Newspapers.com. Retrieved 5 June 2018, from https://www.newspapers.com/image/?spot=20705833

How We Are Related:

Roy Martin was the brother of my grandfather, Charles Lorenzo Martin. Thus, he was my great-uncle. The other siblings were Archie, Robert, and Anna Faye. Roy Martin’s parents were John Thomas and Cordelia Jane (Stone) Martin.

Clarifications: I had to puzzle a minute over one sentence, “One horse was standing on his lower limb which was broken, his foot entangled in the tug and his hand still grasping the lines.” My question was whether it was the horse or the boy that was entangled in the tug. The horse was standing on the boy’s leg and it must have been Roy’s foot entangled in the tug (or the article would have said “hoof” instead of “foot”).

I also had to look up the parts of the harness to clarify what the tug was.  The picture below is from Wikipedia and it shows the tug running from the horse collar back to whatever it is pulling.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_harness#/media/File:Harness_(PSF).png

This graphic shows the tug. (Public Domain photo from Wikipedia)

You can see Roy Martin’s gravestone at the FindAGrave site. It shows that he was born July 23, 1896 and died May 4, 1911.

The Martin Family at Prairie Belle School

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Written by Gail Martin in the fall of 1985 for the Flinthills’ Folk Life Class at Madison High School taught by Anne Wilson.

One hundred years of memories takes us to the beginning, when Prairie Belle School District of Greenwood County, Kansas was formed as District #102 in the fall of 1885. The new district received state funds of six hundred dollars. Then Isaac Cox, L.T. Grooms, and W.A. Barnes were elected to the school board. They spent every penny of the starting fund to acquire the school site, the school house, furniture, supplies and a teacher to be ready for the spring term of 1886.

The school site was acquired from Isaac Cox and consisted of a one-acre plot in the southwest one-fourth of Section 9; Township 23; Range 12 and eighty rods north of the southwest corner on the west line. This site was chosen by a county-appointed committee.

The school board hired Daniel Focht of Madison, Kansas to build a one-room school house for four hundred and fifty dollars. Focht built the house according to the basic plans put out by the state of Kansas. The building with the door, facing the county road on the west, opened onto a landing and a rough flight of steps. A series of three windows were placed on the north and south sides of the school.

Prairie_Belle_No__102__April__1943__roxio

Prairie Belle School, # 102, in Kansas. Photo taken in April 1943.

School furniture was ordered from Burlington Furniture Company in Burlington, Kansas. It was shipped by railroad to Madison, where it was picked up and delivered by wagon to the school. C.L. Allen agreed to teach but resigned after two and half months and H.G. Porter finished two more months. Both teachers received thirty dollars a month. Thus the new district struggled through their first year.

C.L. Thompson was hired to teach eight months beginning in the fall of 1986. That year the school board clerk, C.T. Grooms, recorded a school census of nineteen school-age children from five to twenty-one years of age. The students, that first full year of school, were all from farming families in the district.

The 1886 census included John Thomas Martin, twenty years old; John’s brother, eighteen-year-old Frank Marian and their ten-year-old sister, Cora Gazena. The Martin children’s father, Charles Coleman Martin died that fall on August 16th and their mother, Sarah Ann (Ellison) Martin died the following year, December 27, 1887. Both were buried at No 8 Cemetery.

Those three children were the first of the four generation of Martins to attend Prairie Belle. All five of John Thomas Martin’s children, Archie Lloyd, Charles Lorenzo, Robert Cecil, Roy, and Anna Faye attended through the late 1890’s and early 1900’s. John’s sister Cora’s children, Forrest Edgar, William Vernon and Glen Thomas attended around 1909-1913, making up the second generation.

Dorothy Mae, the oldest of ‘Ren’ Martin’s family, started to school in the 1921-1922 school year. Followed by Helen Elizabeth, Vivian Ruth, Zella Irene, Ralph Edward, Clyde Owen, and Howard Raymond, who attended last in 1943.

Lloyd’s three children, Mildred Maxine, Laverna Elnor, and Leonard John were attending during the same time as Ren’s family, completing the third generation.

Prairie Belle School ks

Some of the last students at Prairie Belle School.

Some of the fourth generation attended until the school district closed in 1951 and sent them by to Madison Grade School. They were Dorothy’s two children, Kenneth Orville and Donna Carolyn Stafford and Zella’s four children, Barbara June, Thomas Eugene, Sharon Marie, and Marilyn Grace.

Some of the other farming families attending during those years were the Barne, Groom, Long, Overholt, Wolford, Cox and McClinic families.

(This essay was retrieved with the Wayback Machine from the My History Is America’s History website which no longer exists.)

 

Some of Our English Roots

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Some months back, I took the Ancestry DNA test. As expected, it showed much of my heritage links back to the British Isles. That part matches what I’m finding as I work on my family tree. Below the chart, I list some of the family lines and where they came from in England.

ancestry dna map.png
Our English Ancestors:

  • Bates family came from Aston Clinton, Buckinghamshire
  • Bixby ancestor came from Thorpe Morieux, Suffolk
  • Browning family came from Maldon, Essex
  • Collier family came from Southwark, Surrey
  • Goodale ancestor came from Ipswich, Suffolk
  • King, West, and Pease ancestors came from Great Baddow, Essex
  • Long ancestors came from West Riding, Yorkshire
  • Putnam ancestors came from Tring, Hertfordshire
  • Tower family came from Hingham
  • Vining ancestors came from Wincanton

I found one suggestion that our Joy family changed their name from Joyce in the 1500s when they moved from Ireland to England. I’ll have to search further on that.

Karen has found indications that the Martin family may trace back to France. There will be more work on that line. We know the Rosebaugh line is from Germany. Various invasions of England over the centuries might account for the Scandinavian part of the DNA. Vikings, you know.

It’s Grandparents Day

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I’d like to feature my father’s parents, my grandparents, Cora Joy and Lorenzo Martin. It’s National Grandparents Day!

Cora Joy and Lorenzo (Ren) Martin on their wedding day February 27, 1915.

Cora Joy and Lorenzo (Ren) Martin on their wedding day.

When Cora Myrle Joy was born on November 18, 1896, in Baldwin City, Kansas, her father, Henry Alfred Joy, was 22 and her mother, Marie Kennedy, was 31. She married Charles Lorenzo “Ren” Martin on February 27, 1915, in Madison, Kansas. They had eight children in 24 years. She died on November 16, 1969 at the age of 72, and was buried at Blakely Cemetery.

When Charles Lorenzo “Ren” Martin was born on May 26, 1891, in Madison, Kansas, his father, John Thomas Martin, was 24 and his mother, Cordelia Jane Stone, was 26. Ren died on March 28, 1968 at the age of 76, and was buried at Blakely Cemetery, Madison, Kansas.

Photos of the Bob Martin Family

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We are so lucky to meet some distant cousins on Facebook. They are interested in the family history too and shared some vintage photos.

To get you oriented, here’s how Robert Cecil Martin fits on our family tree:

Robert Cecil Martin on my family tree

Robert Cecil Martin on my family tree

Many thanks to Skyler Martin, Jona Martin, Linda Haney and Sarah Michelle Martin for preserving and sharing these family images:

Sarah Martin in 1913 at Hilltop, south of Madison, Kansas.

Sarah Martin in 1913 at Hilltop, south of Madison, Kansas.

Sarah Anceldell Clark was born on February 7, 1892, in Toronto, Kansas. Her father, Charnel, was 49 and her mother, Malinda Jane Richardson, was 40 (both were born in Indiana). Sarah married Robert Cecil MARTIN on March 8, 1916, in her hometown. They had one child during their marriage, Robert Cecil Martin Jr.

Here's Sarah and Bob Martin celebrating their 50th anniversary in 1966.   (photo from the collection of Linda Martin Haney)

Here’s Sarah and Bob Martin celebrating their 50th anniversary in 1966.
(photo from the collection of Linda Martin Haney)

When Robert Cecil MARTIN was born on September 7, 1893, in Madison, Kansas, his father, John Thomas Martin, was 27 and his mother, Cordelia Jane Stone, was 28.

ren and bob martin 600 dpi

Ren (Charles Lorenzo Martin) and Bob (Robert Cecil Martin) in front, left to right. Their friends in the back are Rufus Beach & Clarence Hoobler.

Bob was 24 years old and living in Greenwood, Kansas when he registered for the World War I draft.

He, his wife and son lived in Janesville, Kansas.

1960 - The 3 Bobs (Martin)

May 1960, The Three Bobs (Bob Martin with son and grandson)

Robert died at 74 on Jan 24, 1968 in Phoenix, Arizona. Sarah died on August 19, 1974, in Madison, Kansas, at the age of 82, and was buried there.

(Let me know if anything needs correcting or if you have more photos to include)

Throwback Thursday – Martins Gather at the Reading House

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Martin reunion in Reading_editedThis was discussed in the Martin Joy Kennedy Stone Family History group on Facebook. If you haven’t joined yet, you are missing some great photos and family memories.

Here are the details on this one:

Virginia Allain – Martin family gathered in Reading, KS. I think Marge just pinched Mom (Gail).

Karen Kolavalli – Dad is grinning from ear to ear, so I think he’s in on it, too! Dorothy must be the photographer–her 1st husband Orville is in the photo, but not her. Well, Howard’s not in the photo either!

Christine Griffith Crawford – Can you list who’s who?

Karen Kolavalli – Front row, l to r: Marge Martin, Gail Martin, Vivian Stafford, Orville Stafford, Zella Baysinger.

Back row, l to r: Ren Martin, Clyde Martin, Cora Martin, Ed Stafford, Tom Baysinger.