At the Courthouse – Ashlock/Babcock Marriage

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I’m carrying on my mother and grandmother’s work on our family history. In their time, working on genealogy meant trips to courthouses and cemeteries. If those were too far away, Mom sent a letter. It must have been an excruciating wait for that bit of information that might move the family line forward.

Here’s an example:

It seems that she already has the dates, location, and names, so I’m not sure what further information she felt might show up in the marriage application. Of course, it would be pretty nifty to see your ancestor’s signature.

Sadly, the requested document was not to arrive.

The record keeper in Gentry County, Missouri responded with a short two sentence reply that was thriftily typed at the bottom of Mom’s handwritten letter. “We are unable to help you on the above request. The Courthouse in Gentry County, Missouri, burned in the year of 1885, destroying all records prior to 1885.”

How disappointing. I checked on Ancestry to see if somehow a copy of the marriage papers might miraculously have been saved and now online. Nope, the ashes are long blown away in the Missouri winds and no record remains.

Now, Gentry County has an online site with the email address of the Recorder which saves the cost of a stamp and gets your query there much faster. To search their records online, you’ll need a credit card. Ten dollars buys a fifteen-minute search pass so have your questions well-thought out and ready to make the most of that time.

Here’s the new, since 1885, courthouse in Gentry County, Missouri.

Gentry County, Missouri courthouse (By Americasroof – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11384783)

So, how did the marriage of Burr Ashlock and Nancy Jane Babcock turn out? The couple had three children:

Sarilda Jane Ashlock 1867–1951
James F. Ashlock 1869–1879
Isaac Alonzo “Ike” Ashlock 1872–1945

Less than a year after the birth of the youngest son, Burr Ashlock died on the 22 of September in 1973 in Johnson, Missouri. I couldn’t find any old newspapers to explain why he died at the age of 30.

Nancy Jane (Babcock) Ashlock remarried six months later in Wilson County, Kansas at the home of her parents, Ezra B Babcock (1821–1886) and Ellenor Nancy Jane Wright (1820–1882). The groom was Henry Francis Vining who had come to Kansas from East Windsor, Connecticut in the 1850s. It was not unusual to marry fairly quickly in those days with young children needing support.

(This post is part of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks blog challenge. Check back for future posts.)

Tyro Family And Friends

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Playing Croquet – Vintage Photo

This mystery photo was with a batch of family photos from Tyro, Kansas. My mother said these weren’t relatives, so must be friends in Tyro who came to have a game of croquet with our relatives.

Tyro friends playing croquet

The photo is labeled “Tyro friends playing croquet”

I’m guessing the photo is from 1910 to 1917, so before The Great War. They are dressed formally so maybe this was an after-church activity. The young men are wearing newsboy style caps, vests, long-sleeved white shirts, and ties (bow ties and a narrow tie). The McGhee family belonged to the Methodist Church.

In the background of the croquet game is a garden, I think. I’m guessing this might be at the Samuel and Viola Matilda (Tower) McGhee family home. They had a large garden according to their daughter Bertha’s account. She said, “The garden included a strawberry bed, huckleberries, blackberries, raspberries, dewberries, and the orchard had three kinds of peaches, apples, plums, pears as well as the grapes.”

The other option might be at the home of the Vinings, also my ancestors, but I doubt that their yard was this large. Another neighboring family was “the Galliger family with one daughter, Margaret, a little older than me and 3 younger brothers. The three families were soon doing many things together.”

I checked the 1915 Kansas census for Tyro and the 1920 U.S. census for Tyro and don’t see the Galligers listed. It would have been wonderful to look the family up on Ancestry and see if there were any photos of the three younger brothers. No such luck.

Methodist Episcopal Church in Tyro Kansas

Methodist Church in Tyro, Kansas (photo provided by Jack Irwin)

John Vining’s Daughter and Grandchildren

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On the back of the photo in faint pencil, it says “Aunt Ellen Vining, Uncle Jack Vining, Cousin Ida, Cousin Lulu, etc.”

My first guess was that Ellen and Jack (seated in front) were the parents of two grown daughters, named Ida and Lulu (unknown married names). I also hypothesized that the unnamed 3 children were Ida and Lulu’s. I was wrong. 
Ellen & Jack Vining and Ida and Lulu

I couldn’t find anything about the photography studio. On the border of the photo, it says, “Munson – Neosho, MO.”

When I consulted my family tree, there was no Jack Vining and no Ellen Vining. I did have an Ida Vining and that helped solve who was in the picture.

Ida, was born in 1866 to John and Josephine Vining.  John’s dates are 1833-1900 and Josephine was 1836-1870. After Josephine died, John Vining married Elleanor (Ellen) Babcock.

Ida married Abraham Frost. In 1886 they had a daughter Lula. Other children of Ida are Edwin 1888, Ethel 1891, Fred 1893.  This photo with only 4 names on the back looks like a good match for the Vinings and the Frost family.

Ida Vining daughter of John Vining - tree

John and Josephine Vining’s daughter Ida Mary Vining and her children.

From the size of the smallest boy, who looks about five or so, I first guessed this photo might be 1898. The clothing seems appropriate for the Victorian era, turn-of-the-century with Fred wearing a Little Lord Fauntleroy collar and tie. Women’s clothing was slimming down without the hoop skirts of the 1860s or the huge puffed sleeves of the 1880s.

If the photo were from 1898, Lula would have been 12. She looks a little more mature than 12 so the picture might be 1900. At that point, Lula would have been 14, Edwin 12, Ethel 9, and Fred 7.

The children’s grandparents would have been 67 and 54 in 1900.  John Vining died later that year. Ellen lived until 1924 and died at the age of 77.

Ellen and her sister, Nancy Jane Babcock, married two brothers, John and Henry Francis Vining. The above photos show Ellen Babcock Vining by herself, then Ellen, Nancy Jane, Ezra, and Elias Babcock. Nancy Jane is my great-grandmother, so Ellen is my great-aunt.