Alfred and Marie Joy in the News

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(From the Lawrence Gazette, Aug. 9, 1888) — “Teachers Institute. – The Institute now has an enrollment of 114, and the exercises are becoming very interesting…. [Discussion of sessions on grammar, physiology, history, school management, etc.] Marie Kennedy included in the list of those enrolled.

(Lawrence Gazette, July 16, 1891) “The County Superintendent yesterday issued certificates as follows, based on the examination held at the close of the Institute.” [Marie Kennedy, Baldwin, listed under “Second Grade.” Teaching certificates were issued as First, Second, and Third; these were based on your test scores and also on what subjects you were certified to teach, and they also determined how long you could teach before you had to take the test again. I believe a Second Grade certificate was good for six months.]

(From the Lawrence Gazette in August 1891) “No. 58: Director, Barnhart Kramer. Clerk, John Sturm, Clearfield, Treasurer, Wm. Brecheisen. Six months school, beginning October 5. Teacher, Miss Marie Kennedy.” (Marie Kennedy is also listed in the Lawrence Daily Journal on Aug. 24, 1892, as the teacher for No. 58, so she taught there for two terms at least.)

Alfred Joy had nine lives like a cat! These articles tell of some drastic injuries he sustained while doing farm work.

(Lawrence Gazette, Aug. 10, 1893) “Alfred Joy was badly, though it is not supposed fatally injured, one day last week. While helping to thrash at C. A. James’, he attempted to climb up on the wagon from the front, when one horse kicked him on the arm which made him fall to the ground and the wagon passed over him. Dr. Bishoff was immediately sent for and made him as comfortable as possible.” [This would be three years before marrying Marie Kennedy.]

A similar item from the Lawrence Daily World, Aug. 6, 1893, under the heading “A Boy Hurt.” “Alfred Joy was seriously injured Friday on the farm of J. H. Cox, near Hesper, by a wagon running over him. He attempted to climb on a wagon loaded with wheat but the team started throwing him under the wagon.”

Update from Aug. 31, 1893 Lawrence Gazette: “Alfred Joy is much better – is able to work a little; but it will be quite a while before he is as strong as before he was hurt.”

THEIR WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT! Lawrence Daily World, Jan. 18, 1896: “Alfred Joy and Marie Kennedy of Baldwin, were married by the probate judge this morning. The contracting parties are well known in that part of the county and are highly respected.”

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Then they bought a house, I guess! In the real estate transfers for March 9, 1898: “David G. Kennedy and wife to Alfred Joy and wife nw ¼ sec 31, t 14, r 21; con $2,500.” [The sellers are Marie’s parents.]

Then they sold it in 1902: In the real estate transfers for March 31, 1902: “Alfred Joy and wife to J. P. Bell, w ½ of n w ¼, 31, 14, 21; consideration $3,000.” [Looks like they made a $500 profit in 3 years on it.]

(Lawrence Daily World, in the “Belleview-Keystone” local notes, Dec. 27, 1905) “Mr. and Mrs. Tom Oskel, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Douglass, Mrs. Alfred Joy and children took their Christmas dinner with Mr. and Mrs. George Joy.” [I wonder why Alfred Joy was unable to attend. I hope he wasn’t ill. George and Dacy Elizabeth Joy are Alfred’s parents. I’m wondering if Oskel and Douglass are also family. Maybe the Oskel should be Oshel. I have a Thomas Oshel married to Sarah Amelia Joy, a sister of Alfred Joy.]

Marie’s brother passed away in 1906, per this notice from the Lawrence Daily World, May 18, 1906: “James Kennedy died at the home of his brother, last Friday. He had been sick for some time but was only confined to the house for one week before his death. He leaves an aged mother, one sister, Mrs. Alfred Joy at Burlingame, Kan. And several brothers and many friends. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Gray at the Presbyterian church Sunday at 2 o’clock. Burial at Baldwin cemetery.”

The Madison News of July 3, 1937 included the obituary for Henry Alfred Joy. He was born and raised in Eudora, Kansas (Jan. 21, 1874). They lived in Baldwin City until 1908, then moved to Hamilton and later moved southeast of Madison.

Henry_Alfred_Joy_Obituary_7_3_1937

His wife, Marie (Kennedy) Joy lived until July 6, 1945. She was born near Baldwin City, Kansas on December 1, 1864. “She attended Baker University for four years and taught for several years in rural schools in Douglas County.” She spent the last four years of her life at the Methodist Home in Topeka.

Mrs._Marie_Joy_Dies_Madison_News_1945

(Many thanks to Sarah St. John for searching the newspaper database. The scanned clippings are from Gail Lee Martin’s family history notebooks.)

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Some of Our English Roots

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Some months back, I took the Ancestry DNA test. As expected, it showed much of my heritage links back to the British Isles. That part matches what I’m finding as I work on my family tree. Below the chart, I list some of the family lines and where they came from in England.

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Our English Ancestors:

  • Bates family came from Aston Clinton, Buckinghamshire
  • Bixby ancestor came from Thorpe Morieux, Suffolk
  • Browning family came from Maldon, Essex
  • Collier family came from Southwark, Surrey
  • Goodale ancestor came from Ipswich, Suffolk
  • King, West, and Pease ancestors came from Great Baddow, Essex
  • Long ancestors came from West Riding, Yorkshire
  • Putnam ancestors came from Tring, Hertfordshire
  • Tower family came from Hingham
  • Vining ancestors came from Wincanton

I found one suggestion that our Joy family changed their name from Joyce in the 1500s when they moved from Ireland to England. I’ll have to search further on that.

Karen has found indications that the Martin family may trace back to France. There will be more work on that line. We know the Rosebaugh line is from Germany. Various invasions of England over the centuries might account for the Scandinavian part of the DNA. Vikings, you know.

It’s Grandparents Day

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I’d like to feature my father’s parents, my grandparents, Cora Joy and Lorenzo Martin. It’s National Grandparents Day!

Cora Joy and Lorenzo (Ren) Martin on their wedding day February 27, 1915.

Cora Joy and Lorenzo (Ren) Martin on their wedding day.

When Cora Myrle Joy was born on November 18, 1896, in Baldwin City, Kansas, her father, Henry Alfred Joy, was 22 and her mother, Marie Kennedy, was 31. She married Charles Lorenzo “Ren” Martin on February 27, 1915, in Madison, Kansas. They had eight children in 24 years. She died on November 16, 1969 at the age of 72, and was buried at Blakely Cemetery.

When Charles Lorenzo “Ren” Martin was born on May 26, 1891, in Madison, Kansas, his father, John Thomas Martin, was 24 and his mother, Cordelia Jane Stone, was 26. Ren died on March 28, 1968 at the age of 76, and was buried at Blakely Cemetery, Madison, Kansas.

Which Girl Is Cora Joy?

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My mother had this photo in her collection and had noted her guess on its reason for being in our family photos. She thought that it included my dad’s mother, Cora Joy.

My mother wrote on the back of this picture that it might be Cora Joy's high school picture (Hamilton High School).

My mother wrote on the back of this picture that it might be Cora Joy’s high school picture (Hamilton High School).

That would mean the photo is of Hamilton High School students in Greenwood County, Kansas. Cora was born in 1896, so this photo would be 1912 or around that time.

The problem is that I don’t know which one of the girls is my grandmother. I do have a portrait of Cora at age 16 and am trying to compare. In that photo, she wore a big bow so my eye immediately went to the girl on the right with the big bow. The hair part doesn’t look right though.

Cora Myrle Joy

Cora Myrle Joy

I’ve left both photos at their full size so you can compare the details.